Tag Archive | Sexual abuse

Children

Happy children

 

 

I am enjoying my visit with my children! They bring me so much joy! 

I for one can NOT imagine hurting any of my children! To me, it has to take a very sick mind to hurt a child. There is a lot of  talk about grown ups being abused, but let us not forget about the little ones.

I woke up this morning and fixed my cup of coffee and watched some news and once again there was stories of children being abused and babies being abandoned. I couldn’t help but think of my children and how much I love them and how much of a sick mind it takes to hurt a precious child. When they woke up, they got an extra hug.

Here are some shocking statistics about child abuse:

Shocking Statistics About Child Abuse

  • 48% of abused children are boys
  • 52% of abused children are girls
  • 45% of abused children are white race
  • 22% of abused children are African American race
  • 22% of abused children are Hispanic race

Dramatic Increase In Child Abuse Statistics

Let us be their voice and help stop the violence against children!

 

10 Signs Of Child Abuse

Unexplained injuries. Visible signs of physical abuse may include unexplained burns or bruises in the shape of objects. You may also hear unconvincing explanations of a child’s injuries.
Changes in behavior. Abuse can lead to many changes in a child’s behavior. Abused children often appear scared, anxious, depressed, withdrawn or more aggressive.
Returning to earlier behaviors. Abused children may display behaviors shown at earlier ages, such as thumb-sucking, bed-wetting, fear of the dark or strangers. For some children, even loss of acquired language or memory problems may be an issue.
Fear of going home. Abused children may express apprehension or anxiety about leaving school or about going places with the person who is abusing them.
Changes in eating. The stress, fear and anxiety caused by abuse can lead to changes in a child’s eating behaviors, which may result in weight gain or weight loss.
Changes in sleeping. Abused children may have frequent nightmares or have difficulty falling asleep, and as a result may appear tired or fatigued.
Changes in school performance and attendance. Abused children may have difficulty concentrating in school or have excessive absences, sometimes due to adults trying to hide the children’s injuries from authorities.
Lack of personal care or hygiene. Abused and neglected children may appear uncared for. They may present as consistently dirty and have severe body odor, or they may lack sufficient clothing for the weather.
Risk-taking behaviors. Young people who are being abused may engage in high-risk activities such as using drugs or alcohol or carrying a weapon.
Inappropriate sexual behaviors. Children who have been sexually abused may exhibit overly sexualized behavior or use explicit sexual language.
Some signs that a child is experiencing violence or abuse are more obvious than others. Trust your instincts! Suspected abuse is enough of a reason to contact the authorities. You do not need proof.

If You Suspect A Child Has Been Abused

ome signs that a child is experiencing violence or abuse are more obvious than others. Trust your instincts. Suspected abuse is sufficient to contact the authorities. You do not need proof.

If you suspect a child has been abused…

DO:

  • Keep calm.
  • Tell the child you believe them.
  • Show interest and concern.
  • Reassure and support the child.
  • Take action. It could save a child’s life.

DON’T:

  • Panic or overreact.
  • Pressure the child.
  • Confront the offender.
  • Blame the child or minimize the child’s feelings.
  • Overwhelm the child with questions.

Remember….

  • Suspicion of abuse is all that is necessary to file a report
  • Your information can be given anonymously
  • You will be asked to describe your concerns about the child and it will be helpful if you can provide: the child’s name, age, address, gender, school attended (if possible), and names of parents.

 

 

Just some of the facts

What is Child Abuse?

Child abuse, or child maltreatment, is an act by a parent or caretaker that results in or allows the child to be subjected to death, physical injury, sexual assault, or emotional harm. Emotional abuse, neglect, physical abuse, and sexual abuse are all different forms of child abuse.


What are Child Sexual Abuse and Incest?

Child sexual abuse is any sexual act performed with a child by an adult or older child, with or without force or the threat of force. Child sexual abuse is most commonly committed by someone known to the child, including family members. In this case, the act may be considered incest. Incest is overt and/or covert sexual contact or acts between people who are related genetically, by marriage, by living arrangements, or in whom a child perceives a trusting relationship, for example parents, grandparents, siblings, aunts, uncles, cousins, step-parents, foster parents. Incest is one of the most common forms of child sexual abuse. It may start as seemingly innocent touching and progress to more serious acts. It can continue for years. Other individuals who may commit child sexual abuse include neighbors, family friends, baby sitters, religious leaders, youth group leaders, or others with a power advantage of any kind over the child. Child sexual abuse may also be committed by a stranger. The acts can include: touching or non-touching, verbal seduction or abuse, anal or vaginal intercourse, oral sex, sodomy, manual stimulation, direct threats, implied threats, or other forms of abuse.


Every year in the United StatesUp to 10 million children are exposed to domestic violence.

There are nearly 3 million reports of child abuse and neglect made.

Every day in the United States

4 children die as a result of child abuse and neglect.

Over three-quarters of these children are under age 4.

What is the Impact on Children Witnessing Domestic Violence?The emotional toll on children who witness threats or violence against others can be substantial, especially when those involved are familiar to the child and the violence takes place in the home. Children may be affected when they witness domestic violence, regardless of whether or not they are directly abused.

Current research has found that children exposed to domestic violence are at an increased risk for emotional and behavioral problems, including anxiety, depression, and academic problems. The research also suggests that some children who have witnessed domestic violence show no symptoms of psychological distress.

Children’s responses may depend on the severity and frequency of the abuse, the availability of family and community support, and the child’s resilience. Once their safety is assured, most children can overcome the effects of trauma through professional counseling or other supportive interventions.